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Joseph Smith, the Book of Mormon, and the American Renaissance: An Update
TitleJoseph Smith, the Book of Mormon, and the American Renaissance: An Update
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRees, Robert A.
JournalInterpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture
Volume19
Pagination1-16
KeywordsAmerican Literature; Authorship; Joseph Smith
Abstract

This is a follow-up to my article, “Joseph Smith and the American Renaissance,” published in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought in 2002. My purpose in writing that article was to consider Joseph Smith in relation to his more illustrious contemporary American authors — Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman. In that article I tried to demonstrate that in comparison with these writers, Joseph Smith did not possess the literary imagination, talent, authorial maturity, education, cultural milieu, knowledge base, or sophistication necessary to produce the Book of Mormon; nor, I argued, had he possessed all of these characteristics, nor was the time in which the book was produced sufficient to compose such a lengthy, complex, and elaborate narrative. This addendum takes the comparison one step further by examining each writer’s magnum opus and the background, previous writings, and preliminary drafts that preceded its publication — then comparing them with Joseph Smith’s publication of the Book of Mormon. That is, each of the major works of these writers of prose, fiction, and poetry as well as the scriptural text produced by Joseph Smith has a history — one that allows us to trace its evolution from inception to completion.

URLhttp://www.mormoninterpreter.com/joseph-smith-the-book-of-mormon-and-the-american-renaissance-an-update/

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