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Beyond Politics
TitleBeyond Politics
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsNibley, Hugh W.
Book TitleNibley on the Timely and the Timeless
Chapter13
Edition2
Pagination301-328
PublisherReligious Studies Center, Brigham Young University
CityProvo, UT
KeywordsChurch; Daniel 1:19-20; Government; Old Testament; Politics; Question
Abstract

In most languages the Church is designated as that of the last days, and so this speech, which is only a pastiche of quotations from its founders, is unblushingly apocalyptic. Did our grandparents overreact to signs of the times ? For many years a stock cartoon in sophisticated magazines has poked fun at the barefoot, bearded character in the long nightshirt carrying a placard calling all to "Repent, for the End is at Hand." But where is the joke? Ask the smart people who thought up the funny pictures and captions: Where are they now? For all of us as individuals the fashion of this world passeth away; but the Big Bang is something else. How near is that? Should we be con­cerned at all?

The problem may be stated in the form of a little dialogue:

We: Dear Father, whenever the end is scheduled to be, can't you give us an extension of time?

He: Willingly. But tell me first, what will you do with it?

We: Well... ah .. .we will go on doing pretty much what we have been doing; after all, isn't that why we are asking for an extension?

He: And isn't that exactly why I want to end it soon—because you show no inclination to change? Why should I reverse the order of nature so that you can go on doing the very things I want to put an end to?

We: But is what we are doing so terribly wrong? The economy seems sound enough. Why shouldn't we go on doing the things which have made this country great?

He: Haven't I made it clear enough to you what kind of greatness I expect of my offspring? Forget the statistics; you are capable of better things—your stirring commercials don't impress me in the least.

We: But why should we repent when all we are doing is what each considers to be for the best good of himself and the nation?

He: Because it is not you but I who decide what that shall be, and I have told you a hundred times what is best for you individually and col­lectively—and that is repentance, no matter who you are.

We: We find your inference objectionable, Sir, quite unacceptable.

He: I know.

URLhttps://rsc.byu.edu/archived/nibley-timely-and-timeless-classic-essays-hugh-w-nibley-2nd-edition

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